Teacher Workloads

Teacher Workloads in England

In October, the Department for Education (DfE) published its Teacher Workload Survey for 2019, which attempts to act as a national ‘barometer’ for teachers’ working conditions. It also forms a key part of the DfE’s commitment to improving the evidence base on what drives unnecessary teacher workload and what works to reduce it.

Throughout the DfE’s report, which gathered results from a nationally representative survey of teachers over a three-week period, comparisons are made to the same publication in 2016.

Despite small wording changes to the 2019 survey, and efforts to minimise response bias, it is now possible to ask the question, “Teacher Workloads in England – Are They Improving?”

Read More

Trainee Teachers

Four Ways to Make Trainee Teachers Feel More Welcome

Did you know that a quarter of teachers in England work more than 60 hours a week, far in excess of their counterparts elsewhere in the world? Recent research found that teachers in England work 47 hours a week on average during term time, including marking, lesson planning and administration, going up to about 50 hours in the summer during the exam season.

It goes without saying that finding the time for anything other than your daily duties is extremely difficult. But what about helping trainee teachers who are taking their first tentative steps into schools? How can established teachers ensure that the next generation have the best experience possible?

Read More

Teachers Test Pupils

Retrieval Practice: How Best Can Teachers Test What Pupils Have Learnt?

According to research, retrieval is a key process for both learning and understanding. As well as being a neutral assessment of a learner’s knowledge, the act of retrieval itself also produces learning.

But how best can teachers test what pupils have learnt in the classroom? What do you know about memory and how can you develop its capacity to learn?

Read More

Ofsted

What questions do Ofsted ask parents?

As you’re probably already aware, whenever an Ofsted inspection is triggered, the head teacher of a school has to notify parents about the inspection and invite them to complete Parent View – an online survey that gives parents and carers the opportunity to tell Ofsted what they think about their child’s school.

At this moment in time, anyone can log in to the system and complete the survey as many times as they want. Some have argued that this could result in unreliable outcomes, as several questions were considered ‘dangerous’, such as: Read More

Bookshelf 2019

6 Books for Your Teacher Bookshelf 2019

Now that the summer holidays have started, you’re probably relishing the opportunity to put anything school related to the back of your mind. But in addition to some much needed rest and relaxation, you should also consider reading up on a few education topics that interest you.

That way, when the start of term rolls around again, you’ll be full of fresh ideas and impetus, ready to impress yet another year of school children.

Read More

Ofsted Inspection Myths

7 Ofsted Inspection Myths

Despite the fact that every teacher should have read Ofsted’s school inspection handbook, which goes into detail about things like the evaluation schedule and grade descriptors, several inspection myths still exist.

So, to provide clarification over the facts once and for all, here are 7 Ofsted inspection myths you should pay no attention to whatsoever.

Read More

GLC Open Day

Have You Considered Starting Your Teaching Career In Thurrock ?

On Wednesday 13THFebruary 2019, Strategy Education will be co-ordinating an interview day in Thurrock for primary NQTs.

On the day you will have the opportunity to meet a number of Headteachers as well as visit and teach in local schools.

Read More

School Budgets Are Dwindling

Fact: School Budgets Are Dwindling – What Does It Mean?

According to research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies, total school spending per pupil in England fell by about 8 per cent in real terms between 2009-10 and 2017-18. In Wales, it fell by about 5 per cent over the same period.

The reason for higher cuts in England was driven by a combination of a greater fall in spending by local authorities and school sixth form spending alongside faster growth in pupil numbers.

Read More