Teacher Stress

Teacher Stress in England

Teacher stress in England is a topic that has been raised over several years with many teachers opting to leave the profession, retire early or look for alternatives within education. Professor Wettstein carried out a study in 2020  that concluded that many factors lead to teaching being a highly stressful career across the globe.

Many teachers in England each year look towards the private sector for a less stressful teaching option but is this a viable alternative that will reduce teacher stress?

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Essential Books for Teachers

Essential Books for Teachers

All teachers know that their learning about teaching doesn’t stop at the end of their degree or PGCE. As well as developing their own classroom experience, most teachers are genuinely interested in continuing to explore ideas and research.

It can be hard to decide which books to prioritise, so why not look at some recommended titles here:

The Future of Teaching

This is an interesting take on teaching written by Prof Guy Claxton, a cognitive scientist who has some divisive opinions. His critical approach has caused some controversy on social media and the headlines created have certainly brought his book to the attention of many within the profession.

Claxton uses his knowledge to question the use of cognitive science in policymaking that dictates a particular teaching style. With the new Early Years Curriculum coming into play this year it is a very topical subject within the profession.

How Learning Happens

Paul Kirschner and Carl Hendrick have rigorously compiled what they consider to be the most important research publications in the psychology of education and gone on to provide a summary of the conclusions for each with some practical suggestions for teachers to use in the classroom.

This is an excellent book with distinct chapters that contain links to further reading, making this a very practical and accessible work for teachers to learn from.

The BASIC Coaching Method

Written and published by Andy Buck, a former headteacher, this is a guide for teachers and school leaders in the art of coaching.

It provides an excellent background in coaching with strategies for promoting coaching within schools. Designed with lots of interactive questions and self-evaluation it enables the reader to develop their techniques in coaching.

Stop Talking, Start Influencing

With 15 years of experience in conducting brain research, the author Jared Cooney Horvath is well qualified to advise on how people learn.

This book is a great read for those who are interested in finding out how to make their teaching more successful and get a deeper understanding of their students.

Classroom Observation 2.0

Despite a culture shift in the value of classroom observations for making judgements, observation is still very much a regular practice in most schools. This book, written by Prof Matt O’Leary, is an essential read for anyone who has responsibility for observing others.

Based on good research, it shows how effective observations can be when based on reliable evaluation methods. An excellent book for improving observation techniques and adding more value to the results.

Retrieval Practice

Retrieval practice is a very topical idea in education. This book, by Kate Jones, a current teacher, is an excellent example of sharing peer knowledge and research findings to enhance practice.

It provides excellent evidence based ideas to help teachers in the classroom at primary and secondary to develop strategies for improving teaching, learning and long term memory.

Powerful Teaching

This book, written in 2019 is by cognitive scientist Dr Pooja Agarwal and experienced teacher Dr Patrice Bain. Their collaboration led to a practical book that is full of research based ideas to bring easily implemented ideas to be applied in the classroom.

Teaching Walkthrus

This very accessible book by Tom Sherrington and Oliver Caviglioli presents 50 ideas divided into bite sized chunks with illustrations to inform teachers and provide a range of resources to use in class.

Easy to dip into but backed up by educational research it is a great one for teachers to have in their toolkit.

Connect the Dots

Tricia Taylor wrote this book in 2019 to explore the connection between relationships, memory and mindsets in relation to learning.

Based on excellent research in the field it contains useful guides for leaders to enable them to develop CPD training for staff as well as making it a great read for those teachers interested in cognitive science.

What Is CENTURY?

The Number One Platform You Should Be Using

With each passing year and greater breakthroughs in technology, schools and colleges explore different ways to make life easier for teachers and students. While some educators have already moved on to using artificial intelligence, not all are up for it. Of the several reasons, two stand out as most common—shortage of technical infrastructure and lack of proper understanding.

In this article, we will discuss how technology can better the lives of teachers and students.

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Balance Between Curriculum and Assessment

Striking the Right Balance Between Curriculum and Assessment

The changes and uncertainty of the past 12 months have put an incredible strain on everyone, not least teachers. From delivering lessons remotely to supporting pupils with both their studies and their mental health, it’s been an enduring challenge that continues to this day.

In order to help teachers cope with constantly moving goalposts alongside their usual workload, a number of solutions have been designed and implemented with varying degrees of effectiveness.

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Recovering from the pandemic

Let’s put the curriculum centre stage post-pandemic

Ask any teacher what the foundation of schooling is and chances are they’ll say the curriculum. It underpins nearly everything a teacher does – structuring lessons, delivering content and assessing how well students are performing.

So when schools and the wider education world emerges from the pandemic, will the curriculum save the day in terms of the attainment gap and accountability?

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pupil outcomes and reduce their workload

Can teachers raise pupil outcomes and reduce their workload at the same time?

Ask any teacher whether it is possible to raise pupil outcomes while reducing their workload and most will probably answer the same – no.

However, a new book by Robert Powell called Live Feedback explores strategies that promise to engage learners, raise attainment, and reduce the time spent on detailed marking of students’ work.

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Retrieval practice students

Retrieval practice is only as effective as the tasks you choose

A new research paper has revealed that the type of recall task a teacher chooses can substantially influence the effects of learning by retrieval practice.

It matters how to recall – task differences in retrieval practice (Endres et al, November 2020) explores how 54 university students studied two expository texts, followed by retrieval practice tasks.

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Where should teachers focus their efforts this academic year?

For teachers up and down the country, 2020 has been an interesting year to say the least. The coronavirus pandemic and its subsequent lockdown threw our education system into disarray, with millions of parents forced to tackle the challenge of home-schooling.

During this time, teachers themselves became key workers and had to provide pupils with schemes of work that could be delivered remotely. But now teachers must overcome a new obstacle – helping students catch up on work missed during the six-month stretch of school closures.

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5 Teaching Trends

5 Teaching Trends and Predictions for 2020

Beyond the logistics of schools themselves, such as government decisions, the following trends and predictions could soon be part of your regular routine.

If any of the following concepts feel somewhat unfamiliar, your school could be falling behind others in terms of its approach to education and support for teachers.

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Assessment in the Classroom

To Sit Beside, Not Sit Alone: Mastering Assessment in the Classroom

Many teachers will learn that assessment is either summative or formative. But how many actually know the etymological meaning of the word ‘assessment’?

According to Evangeline Harris Stefanakis (2002), “The word assess comes from the Latin assidere, which means to sit beside. Literally then, to assess means to sit beside the learner.”

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