Essential Books for Teachers

Essential Books for Teachers

All teachers know that their learning about teaching doesn’t stop at the end of their degree or PGCE. As well as developing their own classroom experience, most teachers are genuinely interested in continuing to explore ideas and research.

It can be hard to decide which books to prioritise, so why not look at some recommended titles here:

The Future of Teaching

This is an interesting take on teaching written by Prof Guy Claxton, a cognitive scientist who has some divisive opinions. His critical approach has caused some controversy on social media and the headlines created have certainly brought his book to the attention of many within the profession.

Claxton uses his knowledge to question the use of cognitive science in policymaking that dictates a particular teaching style. With the new Early Years Curriculum coming into play this year it is a very topical subject within the profession.

How Learning Happens

Paul Kirschner and Carl Hendrick have rigorously compiled what they consider to be the most important research publications in the psychology of education and gone on to provide a summary of the conclusions for each with some practical suggestions for teachers to use in the classroom.

This is an excellent book with distinct chapters that contain links to further reading, making this a very practical and accessible work for teachers to learn from.

The BASIC Coaching Method

Written and published by Andy Buck, a former headteacher, this is a guide for teachers and school leaders in the art of coaching.

It provides an excellent background in coaching with strategies for promoting coaching within schools. Designed with lots of interactive questions and self-evaluation it enables the reader to develop their techniques in coaching.

Stop Talking, Start Influencing

With 15 years of experience in conducting brain research, the author Jared Cooney Horvath is well qualified to advise on how people learn.

This book is a great read for those who are interested in finding out how to make their teaching more successful and get a deeper understanding of their students.

Classroom Observation 2.0

Despite a culture shift in the value of classroom observations for making judgements, observation is still very much a regular practice in most schools. This book, written by Prof Matt O’Leary, is an essential read for anyone who has responsibility for observing others.

Based on good research, it shows how effective observations can be when based on reliable evaluation methods. An excellent book for improving observation techniques and adding more value to the results.

Retrieval Practice

Retrieval practice is a very topical idea in education. This book, by Kate Jones, a current teacher, is an excellent example of sharing peer knowledge and research findings to enhance practice.

It provides excellent evidence based ideas to help teachers in the classroom at primary and secondary to develop strategies for improving teaching, learning and long term memory.

Powerful Teaching

This book, written in 2019 is by cognitive scientist Dr Pooja Agarwal and experienced teacher Dr Patrice Bain. Their collaboration led to a practical book that is full of research based ideas to bring easily implemented ideas to be applied in the classroom.

Teaching Walkthrus

This very accessible book by Tom Sherrington and Oliver Caviglioli presents 50 ideas divided into bite sized chunks with illustrations to inform teachers and provide a range of resources to use in class.

Easy to dip into but backed up by educational research it is a great one for teachers to have in their toolkit.

Connect the Dots

Tricia Taylor wrote this book in 2019 to explore the connection between relationships, memory and mindsets in relation to learning.

Based on excellent research in the field it contains useful guides for leaders to enable them to develop CPD training for staff as well as making it a great read for those teachers interested in cognitive science.

Remote Teaching Survival and Success

Three Tips for Remote Teaching Survival and Success

It has been approximately one year since the coronavirus pandemic changed the way in which we live, work and socialise. But how well are teachers coping with their remote education environment?

For many, it has been a constant struggle of trying to stay on top of increasing workloads alongside the challenges that come with permanently being online. As a result, this has led to a disconnect between the teacher and the student.

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strategies to improve your teaching

3 questioning strategies to improve your teaching and workload

Questioning and teacher scripts have immeasurable benefits as an assessment tool. They can help with retention, behaviour and self-regulation, not to mention the long-term impact on teacher workload both in and out of the classroom.

What’s more, dialogue in class can help students activate hard thinking, enabling them to elaborate on themes and topics:

“One way for students to shoulder the responsibility for learning is for them to be the readers, writers, speakers, listeners, and thinkers in the classroom through active engagement in social interaction with others,” (Alvermann & Phelps, 2005; Vacca, Vacca, & Mraz, 2011).

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Where should teachers focus their efforts this academic year?

For teachers up and down the country, 2020 has been an interesting year to say the least. The coronavirus pandemic and its subsequent lockdown threw our education system into disarray, with millions of parents forced to tackle the challenge of home-schooling.

During this time, teachers themselves became key workers and had to provide pupils with schemes of work that could be delivered remotely. But now teachers must overcome a new obstacle – helping students catch up on work missed during the six-month stretch of school closures.

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The Impact of COVID-19

The Impact of COVID-19 on Education – How to Sustain Teaching Success

In order to help schools, colleges and education leaders prepare for teaching in the coming months, the OECD and the Global Education Innovation Initiative at Harvard University have collaborated on a new paper.

Schooling disrupted, schooling rethought – How the COVID-19 pandemic is changing education has collected data and analysed information on the education conditions faced in 59 countries.

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Dealing with Criticism and Abuse

Working In An Online World – Dealing with Criticism and Abuse

The current coronavirus pandemic has meant working remotely is the new norm for many. But does that mean we must simply accept that online criticism is standard practice too?

In a new paper – Harmful Comments on Social Media – published by the University of York (Law), author Kathryn Chick explains why social media has become a breeding ground for malicious, abusive, and offensive communications.

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Coronavirus What Next For Education

Post-Coronavirus: What Next For Education?

It goes without saying that every organisation and industry around the world is being affected by COVID-19, especially education.

According to the OECD, every week of school closures will cause a massive loss in the development of human capital with significant long-term economic and social implications.

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5 Teaching Trends

5 Teaching Trends and Predictions for 2020

Beyond the logistics of schools themselves, such as government decisions, the following trends and predictions could soon be part of your regular routine.

If any of the following concepts feel somewhat unfamiliar, your school could be falling behind others in terms of its approach to education and support for teachers.

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websites for teachers

15 websites that every teacher and educator should know about

Professional development is at the heart of teacher practice. But in addition to learning on the job and formal training courses, you can increase your confidence and competence as a teacher by accessing the abundance of resources available online today, starting with the following:

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10 Top Autum Books 2018

Top 10 Autumn Book Reads 2018

Now that the Summer holidays have past, the Autumn term is in full swing.

For those teachers that like a little extra curricular reading, there are no end of books written by experienced teachers or education professionals, which not only provide intriguing insight, but also some excellent advice.

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